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Graduate Programs

education graduate Learning Outcomes and Curriculum Map

Saint Xavier University is dedicated to providing top-quality education that is intentionally designed to develop your skills and expertise as you prepare for the next step in your education or career. The learning outcomes reflect the specific competencies that you will gain from our program, while the curriculum map portrays how these competencies will shape and prepare you for the real world.

All Initial Licensure Students Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes for All Initial Licensure Students (Illinois Professional Teaching Standards):

Teaching Diverse Students

The competent teacher understands the diverse characteristics and abilities of each student and how individuals develop and learn within the context of their social, economic, cultural, linguistic and academic experiences. The teacher uses these experiences to create instructional opportunities that maximize student learning.

Content Area and Pedagogical Knowledge

The competent teacher has in-depth understanding of content area knowledge that includes central concepts, methods of inquiry, structures of the disciplines and literacy. The teacher creates meaningful learning experiences for each student based upon interactions among content area, pedagogical knowledge and evidence-based practice.

Planning for Differentiated Instruction

The competent teacher plans and designs instruction based on content area knowledge, diverse student characteristics, student performance data, curriculum goals and the community context. The teacher plans for ongoing student growth and achievement.

Learning Environment

The competent teacher structures a safe and healthy learning environment that facilitates cultural and linguistic responsiveness, emotional well-being, self-efficacy, positive social interaction, mutual respect, active engagement, academic risk-taking, self-motivation and personal goal-setting.

Instructional Delivery

The competent teacher differentiates instruction by using a variety of strategies that support critical and creative thinking, problem-solving, continuous growth and learning. This teacher understands that the classroom is a dynamic environment that requires ongoing modification of instruction to enhance learning for each student.

Reading, Writing and Oral Communication

The competent teacher has foundational knowledge of reading, writing and oral communication within the content area and recognizes and addresses student reading, writing and oral communication needs to facilitate the acquisition of content knowledge.

Assessment

The competent teacher understands and uses appropriate formative and summative assessments for determining student needs, monitoring student progress, measuring student growth and evaluating student outcomes. The teacher makes decisions driven by data about curricular and instructional effectiveness and adjusts practices to meet the needs of each student.

Collaborative Relationships

The competent teacher builds and maintains collaborative relationships to foster cognitive, linguistic, physical, social and emotional development. This teacher works as a team member with professional colleagues, students, parents or guardians and community members.

Professionalism, Leadership and Advocacy

The competent teacher is an ethical and reflective practitioner who exhibits professionalism, provides leadership in the learning community and advocates for students, parents or guardians and the profession.

Advanced Programs Learning Outcomes

Multicategorical Special Education Initial Preparation Program -- (Council for Exceptional Children)

Learner Development and Individual Learning Differences

  • Beginning special education professionals understand how exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals understand how language, culture and family background influence the learning of individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals use understanding of development and individual differences to respond to the needs of individuals with exceptionalities.

Learning Environments

  • Beginning special education professionals create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being, positive social interactions and self-determination.
  • Beginning special education professionals, through collaboration with general educators and other colleagues, create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments to engage individuals with exceptionalities in meaningful learning activities and social interactions.
  • Beginning special education professionals use motivational and instructional interventions to teach individuals with exceptionalities how to adapt to different environments.
  • Beginning special education professionals know how to intervene safely and appropriately with individuals with exceptionalities in crisis.

Curricular Content Knowledge

  • Beginning special education professionals use knowledge of general and specialized curricula to individualize learning for individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals understand the central concepts, structures of the discipline and tools of inquiry of the content areas they teach, and can organize this knowledge, integrate cross-disciplinary skills and develop meaningful learning progressions for individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals understand and use general and specialized content knowledge for teaching across curricular content areas to individualize learning for individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals modify general and specialized curricula to make them accessible to individuals with exceptionalities.

Assessment

  • Beginning special education professionals use multiple methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions.
  • Beginning special education professionals select and use technically sound formal and informal assessments that minimize bias.
  • Beginning special education professionals use knowledge of measurement principles and practices to interpret assessment results and guide educational decisions for individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals, in collaboration with colleagues and families, use multiple types of assessment information in making decisions about individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals engage individuals with exceptionalities to work toward quality learning and performance and provide feedback to guide them.

Instructional Planning and Strategies

  • Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals consider individual abilities, interests, learning environments and cultural and linguistic factors in the selection, development and adaptation of learning experiences for individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals use technologies to support instructional assessment, planning and delivery for individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals are familiar with augmentative and alternative communication systems and a variety of assistive technologies to support the communication and learning of individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals use strategies to enhance language development and communication skills of individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Beginning special education professionals develop and implement a variety of education and transition plans for individuals with exceptionalities across a wide range of settings and different learning experiences in collaboration with individuals, families and teams.
  • Beginning special education professionals teach to mastery and promote generalization of learning.
  • Beginning special education professionals teach cross-disciplinary knowledge and skills such as critical thinking and problem solving to individuals with exceptionalities.

Professional Learning and Ethical Practice

  • Beginning special education professionals use foundational knowledge of the field and their professional ethical principles and practice standards to inform special education practice, to engage in lifelong learning, and to advance the profession.
  • Beginning special education professionals use professional ethical principles and professional practice standards to guide their practice.
  • Beginning special education professionals understand how foundational knowledge and current issues influence professional practice.
  • Beginning special education professionals understand that diversity is a part of families, cultures and schools and that complex human issues can interact with the delivery of special education services.
  • Beginning special education professionals understand the significance of lifelong learning and participate in professional activities and learning communities.
  • Beginning special education professionals advance the profession by engaging in activities such as advocacy and mentoring.
  • Beginning special education professionals provide guidance and direction to para-educators, tutors and volunteers.

7.0 Collaboration

  • Beginning special education professionals collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, individuals with exceptionalities and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
  • Beginning special education professionals use the theory and elements of effective collaboration.
  • Beginning special education professionals serve as a collaborative resource to colleagues.
  • Beginning special education professionals use collaboration to promote the well being of individuals with exceptionalities across a wide range of settings and collaborators.

TESOL ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults Program -- (TESOL International Association)

Domain: Planning - Teachers plan instruction to promote learning and meet learner goals and modify plans to assure learner engagement and achievement.

Domain: Instructing - ;Teachers create supportive environments that engage all learners in purposeful learning and promote respectful classroom interactions.

Domain: Assessing - Teachers recognize the importance of and are able to gather and interpret information about learning and performance to promote the continuous intellectual and linguistic development of each learner. Teachers use knowledge of student performance to make decisions about planning and instruction "on the spot" and for the future. Teachers involve learners in determining what will be assessed and provide constructive feedback to learners, based on assessments of their learning.

Domain: Identity and Context - Teachers understand the importance of who learners are and how their communities, heritages and goals shape learning and expectations of learning. Teachers recognize the importance how context contributes to identity formation and therefore influences learning. Teachers use this knowledge of identity and settings in planning, instructing and assessing.

Domain: Language Proficiency - Teachers demonstrate proficiency in social, business/workplace and academic English. Proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing means that a teacher is functionally equivalent to a native speaker with some higher education.

Domain: Learning - Teachers draw on their knowledge of language and adult language learning to understand the processes by which learners acquire a new language in and out of classroom settings. They use this knowledge to support adult language learning.

Domain: Content - Teachers understand that language learning is most likely to occur when learners are trying to use the language for genuine communicative purposes. Teachers understand that the content of the language courser is the language that learners need in order to listen, talk about, read and write about a subject matter or content area. Teachers design their lessons to help learners acquire the language they need to successfully communicate in the subject or content areas they want/need to learn about.

Domain: Commitment and Professionalism - Teachers continue to grow in their understanding of the relationship of second language teaching and learning to the community of English language teaching professionals, the broader teaching community, communities at large and use these understandings to inform and change themselves and these communities.

Initial TESOL Program -- ESL Teacher Education (TESOL International Association):

Domain 1. Language - Candidates know, understand and use the major theories and research related to the structure and acquisition of language to help English language learners' (ELLs') develop language and literacy and achieve in the content areas.

Language as a System - Candidates demonstrate understanding of language as a system, including phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics and semantics and support ELLs as they acquire English language and literacy in order to achieve in the content areas.

Language Acquisition and Development - Candidates understand and apply theories and research in language acquisition and development to support their ELLs' English language and literacy learning and content-area achievement.

Domain 2. Culture - Candidates know, understand, and use major concepts, principles, theories and research related to the nature and role of culture and cultural groups to construct supportive learning environments for ELLs.

Culture as It Affects Student Learning - Candidates know, understand, and use major theories and research related to the nature and role of culture in their instruction. They demonstrate understanding of how cultural groups and individual cultural identities affect language learning and school achievement.

Domain 3. Planning, Implementing and Managing Instruction - Candidates know, understand, and use evidence-based practices and strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing standards-based ESL and content instruction. Candidates are knowledgeable about program models and skilled in teaching strategies for developing and integrating language skills. They integrate technology as well as choose and adapt classroom resources appropriate for their ELLs.

Planning for Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction - Candidates know, understand and apply concepts, research, and best practices to plan classroom instruction in a supportive learning environment for ELLs. They plan for multilevel classrooms with learners from diverse backgrounds using standards-based ESL and content curriculum.

Implementing and Managing Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction - Candidates know, manage, and implement a variety of standards-based teaching strategies and techniques for developing and integrating English listening, speaking, reading and writing. Candidates support ELLs' access to the core curriculum by teaching language through academic content.

Using Resources and Technology Effectively in ESL and Content Instruction - Candidates are familiar with a wide range of standards-based materials, resources and technologies, and choose, adapt and use them in effective ESL and content teaching.

Domain 4. Assessment- Candidates demonstrate understanding of issues and concepts of assessment and use standards-based procedures with ELLs.

Issues of Assessment for English Language Learners - Candidates demonstrate understanding of various assessment issues as they affect ELLs, such as accountability, bias, special education testing, language proficiency and accommodations in formal testing situations.

Language Proficiency Assessment - Candidates know and can use a variety of standards-based language proficiency instruments to show language growth and to inform their instruction. They demonstrate understanding of their uses for identification, placement and reclassification of ELLs.

Classroom-Based Assessment for ESL - Candidates know and can use a variety of performance-based assessment tools and techniques to inform instruction for in the classroom.

Domain 5. Professionalism - Candidates keep current with new instructional techniques, research results, advances in the ESL field, and education policy issues and demonstrate knowledge of the history of ESL teaching. They use such information to reflect on and improve their instruction and assessment practices. Candidates work collaboratively with school staff and the community to improve the learning environment, provide support and advocate for ELLs and their families.

ESL Research and History - Candidates demonstrate knowledge of history, research, educational public policy and current practice in the field of ESL teaching and apply this knowledge to inform teaching and learning.

Professional Development, Partnerships, and Advocacy - Candidates take advantage of professional growth opportunities and demonstrate the ability to build partnerships with colleagues and students' families, serve as community resources and advocate for ELLs.

Curriculum Maps

Education Curriculum Maps

If you would like to learn more about what you can expect from the program, please review the following: